latimes:

Author J.D. Salinger’s secluded former home in Cornish, New Hampshire, is for sale for $679,000. Salinger bought the home in 1953, the year his “Nine Stories” was published. He sold it in the 1960s, but remained in Cornish.

"Whether or not Salinger actually wrote much in the house is something of a mystery," books reporter Carolyn Kellogg notes, but the stories “Franny,” “Raise High the Roof Beam, Carpenters,” “Zooey” and “Seymour: An Introduction” were published during the years he lived there. (“The Catcher in the Rye” was published before he moved in.)

Photos: Jim Mauchly / Mountain Graphics Photography

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theparisreview:

A bit of searing on-the-ground reporting from James Joyce’s birthday party, 1931: “The waiter brings a special wine which Joyce recommends to us very earnestly though he does not drink it himself as it is red. It is Clos Saint Patrice, 1920 … ‘He is the only saint whom a man can get drunk in honor of,’ Joyce says, praising Patrick in this way. We laugh, but he insists that this is high praise … In the apartment to which we return there is jollity. George Joyce sings; Sullivan sings; James Joyce sings.”
For more of this morning’s roundup, click here.

theparisreview:

A bit of searing on-the-ground reporting from James Joyce’s birthday party, 1931: “The waiter brings a special wine which Joyce recommends to us very earnestly though he does not drink it himself as it is red. It is Clos Saint Patrice, 1920 … ‘He is the only saint whom a man can get drunk in honor of,’ Joyce says, praising Patrick in this way. We laugh, but he insists that this is high praise … In the apartment to which we return there is jollity. George Joyce sings; Sullivan sings; James Joyce sings.”

For more of this morning’s roundup, click here.

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Steve McQueen - Deadpan (1997)
Turner Prize-winning artist Steve McQueen—now best known for his feature films, Hunger, Shame, and 12 Years a Slave—put himself in the line of fire in Deadpan (1997), a restaging of Buster Keaton’s falling house gag from Steamboat Bill Jr. McQueen does more than remake the stunt; his presence as a black man transforms the work into a commentary on race relations and the precariousness of the black experience. 

"Damage Control: How Artists Destroy to Create Art"

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